bishopsgate

  • Type
  • Mixed Use, Multi-Residential
  • Client
  • Bloc
  • Location
  • Wickham, Newcastle
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  • Project Details
  • Sited to the periphery of the 'West End' character precinct, the site is located within the gateway to the Newcastle city centre. The architecture responds to the state of transition of the surrounding built context and character. Deriving its language from the rich, textural industrial character of the surrounding context. The building 'base' of brick reflects key surrounding buildings, as well as giving a sense of materiality and scale to the immediate street. It defines the future street wall and therefore the streetscape and public domain.

    In contrast, the setback upper 'tower' alludes to Wickham's future development through its white 'skeletal' frame. The white portal frame steps rhythmically across each facade, defining a sense of scale and proportion and achieving a sense of change along its expanse. Balconies are set back from the frame opening the building edges and softening its presence on the skyline.

    The positioning and scale of the 'tower' component of the proposal creates a buffer to surrounding existing and future residential developments, as well as providing greater private open space to residents. Floorplates are thus designed efficiently, with emphasis on capturing vistas and ensuring solar amenity to all residents and natural ventilation.

    The development also provides a mix of unit types, providing for a variety of lifestyles, resident numbers and facilitate a mix of social diversity. Communal rooftop space takes advantage of solar access and existing vistas, encouraging year round social interaction.
 
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"To ensure architectural definition of the street wall and activation of commercial frontages, landscaping occurs above ground level and on the rooftop. Fixed planting in these locations will enhance the biodiversity of the immediate context, as well as alleviating the roof's impact on the heat island effect."

Hannah Walsh